Grant Receipient Case Studies

DigitalGlobe Foundation grants are being used for many interesting and worthwhile projects around the globe. Since the DigitalGlobe Foundation was established, thousands-of-square-kilometers of imagery have been granted to universities in the United States and overseas. These imagery grants support research in a wide range of fields. The following list is a sampling of projects supported by the DigitalGlobe Foundation.

  • Disaster Response and Recovery
  • Archaeology
  • Climate Change
  • Environmental Studies
  • Fishery Management
  • Water and Natural Resource Management
  • Coastal Studies
  • Homeland Defense and Security
  • Urban Planning
  • Forestry

Case Study Examples

Below are a few case studies by researchers, scientists and geospatial experts regarding their use of geospatial imagery, the impact it's having on their studies and the unique solutions they've discovered.

USE OF HIGH RESOLUTION SATELLITE IMAGERY TO MAP THE ALPINE TREELINE ECOTONE OF THE NEPAL HIMALAYAS

The alpine treeline ecotone is an important component of high altitude mountain ecosystems and plays a vital role in the life of indigenous people, conserves natural resources, maintains biological diversity, controls the geo-hydrological cycle, and provides other ecosystem benefits.



Texas A&M University
Researcher name: P. K. Chhetri
Research location: Nepal
Research subject: Climate Change

DISTRIBUTION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROLS ON INSHORE CORAL REEFS

This research interests involve examining the linkages between calcium carbonate-producing marine communities and coastal land form morphology within tropical systems. More specifically quantifying aspects of reef calcification and biological erosion, examining sediment transport pathways within reef environments, and understanding Holocene reef growth and ecological community structure in turbid zone reef environments.



University of Exeter
Researcher name: K. Morgan
Research location: Australia
Research subject: Coastal Studies

RAPID ADVANCE OF TWO MOUNTAIN GLACIERS IN RESPONSE TO MINE-RELATED DEBRIS LOADING

Rapid glacier speed-ups and associated terminus advances have been widely attributed to either hydrological or thermal switching, especially in larger valley glacier systems. However, the potential role of large landslides onto the surface of these and smaller glaciers in the initiation of significant advances has not been extensively or systematically investigated despite a handful of historical case studies on landslide-ice flow linkages.



Durham University
Researcher name: S. Jamieson
Research location: Kyrgyzstan
Research subject: Climate Change

MAPPING THE INTERNAL STRUCTURE OF HOPEWELL TUMULI IN THE LOWER ILLINOIS RIVER VALLEY THROUGH ARCHAEOLOGICAL GEOPHYSICS

Archaeologists from the Center for American Archaeology in Kampsville, Illinois, began a study to test the potential for magnetic gradiometry, ground-penetrating radar, and electrical resistance tomography to effectively document the internal structure of a variety of Middle and Late Woodland mounds in the Lower Illinois River Valley.



Eberhard Karls Universitat Tubingen
Researcher name: J. Herrmann
Research location: Iraq
Research subject: Archaeology

INCORPORATING DEM UNCERTAINTY IN COASTAL INUNDATION MAPPING

The 0.2 m of approximate global sea level rise (SLR) over the past 100 years is the result of higher global temperatures due to increased atmospheric CO2 levels. This rise is forecast to accelerate during the next decades, reaching a level of about 1 m or more by 2100, potentially resulting in the permanent inundation of large areas of low-lying coastal land.



University of Queensland
Researcher name: J. Leon
Research location: Solomon Island
Research subject: Climate Change

APPLICATION OF HOUGH FORESTS FOR THE DETECTION OF GRAVE MOUNDS IN HIGH-RESOLUTION SATELLITE IMAGERY

The frozen tombs of Iron Age civilizations in the Altai Mountains are under threat. This unique cultural heritage and invaluable archaeological source being preserved for more than 2000 years runs the risk of ultimately being destroyed by climatic change i.e. the thawing of the permafrost.



University of Hamburg
Researcher name: G. Caspari
Research location: China
Research subject: Archaeology

URBAN ECOSYSTEMS MAPPING FROM SPACEBORNE HIGH-RESOLUTION OPTICAL DATA

In the light of past and present urbanization trends, accurate information on the state, accessibility, distribution and supply of urban green spaces plays an increasingly important role for sustainable urban development, conservation of ecosystem functionality and human well-being.



The Royal Institute of Technology
Researcher name: J. Hass
Research location: China
Research subject: Biodiversity

SATELLITE-BASED MONITORING OF LOOTING AND DAMAGE TO ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITES IN SYRIA

This article presents analysis of recent, high-resolution satellite imagery to document looting and damage to archaeological sites in Syria that have taken place as a consequence of the ongoing civil war. The effort relies on 2012 and 2013 GeoEye-1 and WorldView imagery covering 30 key sites.



University of Arkansas
Researcher name: J. Casana
Research location: Syria
Research subject: Archaeology

EVALUATING THE POTENTIAL OF USING MULTISPECTRAL IMAGERY TO IDENTIFY AREAS OF METHAMPHETAMINE PRODUCTION IN JASPER COUNTY, MISSOURI

Methamphetamine abuse and manufacture is still a growing national problem. While the use of GIS and remote sensing techniques in law enforcement has increased over the last 30 years, most models are retrospective; they are not as predictive as they are informative.



Missouri State University
Researcher name: M. Hall
Research location: Missouri
Research subject: Risk Management

AN EMPEROR PENGUIN POPULATION ESTIMATE: THE FIRST GLOBAL, SYNOPTIC SURVEY OF A SPECIES FROM SPACE

An accurate assessment of the emperor penguin (Aptenodytes fosteri) population is urgently needed as recent research indicates that numbers may decrease significantly in coming decades. These studies have highlighted the susceptibility of emperor penguins to changes in sea ice distribution



University of Minnesota
Researcher name: M. LaRue
Research location: Antarctica
Research subject: Biodiversity

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